DANIEL H. BULLOCK, Ph.D.

 

Professor, Cognitive & Neural Systems Department and Psychology Department

Member, Program in Neuroscience and CELEST
Boston University, 677 Beacon Street, Boston, MA 02215   

 

EMAIL: danb@cns.bu.edu

RESEARCH AND TEACHING INTERESTS:

 

Neural Models of Voluntary Action and Reinforcement Learning
Neural Models of Sensory-Motor Learning, Procedural Memory, & Performance

Neural Models of Adaptive Timing, Serial Order Coding, & Competitive Queuing

Neural Models of Local Circuits and Intracellular Dynamics

Neural Models of Basal Ganglia, Frontal Cortex, Cerebellum, & Spinal Cord
Social Cognition & Cognitive Convergence Rate

Robotics Applications of Neuroscience & Biomechanics


Recent papers available as pdf files via email (danb@cns.bu.edu) request or weblinks:


All paper citations prefixed by # in my publication list (see below) are available as pdf files.

 

Selected Recent Presentations:

 

 Modeling basal ganglia interactions with cortical and subcortical networks during reinforcement learning and action.” Invited lecture at the International Joint Conference on Neural Networks, Washington, D.C., 18 July 2001.
How the brain composes actions: Neural network models".  Invited lecture at the Center for Ecological Studies of Perception and Action, University of Connecticut at Storrs, 29 October 2001.
Reduction of movement instabilities by cerebellar adaptive timing and recurrence.”  Invited lecture in the CBD/PMCN mini-symposium on Dynamics of Pathological Rhythms in the Nervous System, held at Boston University, 14 December 2001.
Neural dynamics of ocular tracking, interceptive reaching, and reach/grasp coordination.”  Invited lecture at the Sixth International Conference on Cognitive and Neural Systems, Boston University, 1 June 2002.
How the basal ganglia and laminar frontal cortex cooperate in action selection, action blocking, and learning”. Invited lecture presented at the Workshop on Systems Models at the Mathematical Biosciences Institute of Ohio State University, 19 November 2002. Video available online at http://www.mbi.osu.edu/2002/ws6abstracts.html.
Competitive queuing: From Lashley to present”. Lecture at the Mini-Symposium: Performance of fixed, pre-planned movement sequences: Timing, errors, and representations. The 1st European Workshop on Movement Science, "Mechanics, Physiology, Psychology", Münster, Germany, 22-24 May 2003.
Self-organization of grip and load forces: Staggered command generation by a recurrent cerebellar model.”  Lecture at the 7th International Conference on Cognitive and Neural Systems, Boston University, Boston, MA, 29 May 2003.
Piecewise functional reconstruction of the basal ganglia circuit.” Invited lecture at the Workshop on Sensory Motor Systems at the Mathematical Biosciences Institute of Ohio State University, 9-13 June 2003.
Dynamics of basal ganglia-cortex interactions during learning, planning, and gating of conditional action”.  Invited lecture at the Brain, Behavior & Cognition Colloquium, Psychology Department, Boston University, 17 October 2003.

“Piecewise functional reconstruction of the basal ganglia circuit.” Invited lecture presented at the Workshop on Sensory Motor Systems at the Mathematical Biosciences Institute of Ohio State University, 9-13 June 2003.

“Dynamics of basal ganglia-cortex interactions during learning, planning, and gating of conditional action”.  Invited lecture delivered to the Brain, Behavior & Cognition Colloquium, Psychology Department, Boston University, 17 October 2003.

“From parallel sequence representations to calligraphic control.”  Invited keynote address delivered at the 11th meeting of the International Graphonomics Society, Scottsdale, AZ, 4 November 2003.

“Constructing a theory of intelligence by reverse engineering the brain.”  Presentation to the Freshman Trustee Scholars, Boston University, 27 September 2004.

“A theory of cortico-subcortical interactions during planning, learning and voluntary control of actions.”  Invited lecture to the Action Club at The Pennsylvania State University, 3 December 2004.

“Modeling cortico-subcortical interactions during planning, learning and voluntary control of actions”.  A CELEST Science of Learning Seminar presented at the Cognitive & Neural Systems Department, Boston University, 21 January 2005.

“Cooperation of neural circuits for queuing and timing of fluent action”.  Invited lecture presented in the Symposium on The Control of Interceptive Actions at the Institute for Fundamental and Clinical Human Movement Sciences, Free University, Amsterdam, 3 March 2005.

“Constructing a model of how the cerebellum may contribute to adaptive timing and sequence learning”.  Invited lecture at the Neuroscience Institute, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee, 5 April 2005.

“Modeling cortico-subcortical interactions during planning, learning, and voluntary control of actions”.  Invited lecture in the Special Session on Models of Cortical and Subcortical Circuits at the International Joint Conference on Neural Networks, Montreal, Quebec, 2 August 2005.

“Fifty cell types you just can’t GO without.” Presentation delivered to the Anniversary Conference Celebrating Stephen Grossberg@65 and CNS@15, Boston University, 17 September 2005.

“Adaptive neural models of queuing and timing in fluent action.”  Invited colloquium presentation at the Department of Psychology, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, U.K., 7 March 2006.

“Modeling frontal circuits that control unfamiliar and learned sequences.” Invited presentation in: “Experimental and computational cognitive neuroscience:  Towards a synthesis” A Satellite Symposium at the 2006 Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Neuroscience Society, Hyatt Regency Ballroom, San Francisco, 8 April 2006.

“Learning in cognitive-emotional interactions and planned sequential behavior.”  Invited presentation in the NSF Science of Learning Centers Symposium at the Tenth International Conference on Cognitive and Neural Systems, Boston University, 18 May 2006.

“Computational models of cortico-subcortical interactions during planning, learning, and voluntary control of action sequences.” Invited lecture at the Volen Center for Complex Systems, Brandeis University, 23 April 2007.

“Modeling neural circuits for reward-guided learning, evaluation, and decision.”  Invited lecture at the Workshop on Biologically Inspired Cognitive Architectures (BICA) at the 11th International Conference on Cognitive and Neural Systems, Boston University, 16 May 2007.

“Understanding neural bases for decision and action.” Presentation in the Symposium “Frontiers in Neuroscience: How does a brain give rise to a mind?” at the National Conference of the Society for Advancement of Chicanos and Native Americans in Science (SACNAS), Kansas City, 12 October 2007.

“Exploring computational implications of microcircuit specializations in the fronto-striatal system.” Invited lecture at the Colloquium of the Neuroscience and Cognitive Science Program, University of Maryland, 22 February 2008.

“Modeling neural circuits for reinforcement learning, decision, and action.”  Invited lecture at the Psychology Department Reunion in honor of Professor Allen Neuringer, Reed College, 7 June 2008.

“Modeling the primate brain’s micro-circuit bases for learning and voluntary control of procedures.”  Invited Plenary Address to be given at the Fourth International Conference on Intelligent Computing (ICIC), Shanghai, China, 15-18 September 2008.

 

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE:

·      Professor, Cognitive and Neural Systems Department and Psychology Department, Boston University, 2007-present

·       Associate Professor, Cognitive and Neural Systems Department and Psychology Department, Boston University, 1990–2007

·        Visiting Scientist, Department of Control Systems Engineering, University of Valladolid, Spain, 1994–1995

·        Assistant Professor, Cognitive and Neural Systems Program and Psychology Department, Boston University, 1988–1990

·        Senior Research Associate, Center for Adaptive Systems, Boston University, 1985–1988

·        Assistant Professor, Psychology Department, University of Denver, 1982–1986

·        Instructor, Psychology Department, University of Denver, 1981–1982

 

EDUCATION:

 

·        Postdoctoral Study, Developmental Psychology, University of Denver, Denver, Colorado, 1979–1981

·        Ph.D., Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, 1979; dissertation advisor: Prof. Albert Bandura

·        B.A., Psychology, Reed College, Portland, Oregon, 1974; thesis advisor: Prof. Allen Neuringer

 

HONORS & AWARDS:

 

·        Second Heinz Prechtl Lecturer, University of Groningen, 1994

·        NIMH Postdoctoral Traineeship, University of Denver, 1979–1981

·        National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship, 1974–1977

·        Highest GPA, Reed College, Class of 1974

·        Phi Beta Kappa, Reed College, 1974

·        Highest GPA, Spalding Institute High School, Class of 1970

 

ASSOCIATION MEMBERSHIPS: American Psychological Society, International Neural Network Society, Society for Neuroscience.

 

PUBLICATIONS:

 

1. Bullock, D. and Neuringer, A. (1977).  Social learning by following: An analysis.  Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 27: 127–135.

2. Bullock, D. and Merrill, L. (1980).  The impact of personal preference on consistency through time: The case of childhood aggression.  Child Development, 51: 808–814.

3. Bullock, D. and Fischer, K.W. (1981).  The last straw for Piagetian stages?  A review of D.H. Feldman's Beyond Universals in Cognitive Development.  In Contemporary Psychology, 26: 336–337.

4. Bullock, D. (1981).  On the current and potential scope of generative theories of cognitive development.  In K.W. Fischer (Ed.), Cognitive Development, New Directions for Child Development, No. 12.  San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, pp.93–109.

5. Fischer, K.W. and Bullock, D. (1981).  Patterns of data: Sequence, synchrony, and constraint in cognitive development.  In K.W. Fischer (Ed.), Cognitive Development, New Directions for Child Development, No. 12.  San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, pp.1–20.

6. Bullock, D. (1983).  Seeking relations between cognitive and social-interactive transitions.  In K.W. Fischer (Ed.), Levels and Transitions in Children's Development.  New Directons for Child Development, No. 21.  San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, pp.97–108.

7. Bullock, D. (1984).  Distributions and distributional rules from the child's perspective.  A review of R.L. Leahy (Ed.), The Child's Construction of Social Inequality.  Contemporary Psychology, 29: 657–658.

8. Fischer, K.W. and Bullock, D. (1984).  Cognitive development in school-age children: Conclusions and new directions.  In W.A. Collins (Ed.), Development During Middle Childhood. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, pp.70–146.

9.  Fischer, K.W., Pipp, S.L., and Bullock, D. (1984).  Detecting discontinuities in development: Method and measurement.  In R. Harmon and R.N. Emde (Eds.), Continuities and Discontinuities in Development.  New York: Plenum Press, pp.95–121.

10. Adams, A.K. and Bullock, D. (1986). Apprenticeship in word use: Social convergence processes in learning categorically related nouns.  In S.A. Kuczaj, II and M.D. Barrett (Eds.), The Development of Word Meaning.  New York: Springer-Verlag, pp.155–197.

11. Bullock, D. (1986).  Culture's hand in the making of self and emotion.  A review of R. Shweder and R. Levine (Eds.), Culture Theory: Essays on Mind, Self, and Emotion. Contemporary Psychology, 31: 347–349.

12. Bullock, D. and Fischer, K.W. (1986).  Review of J. Piaget, The Equilibration of Cognitive Structures.  American Scientist, 74, 660.

13. Bullock, D. (1986). Artificial Neural Systems.  Mass High Tech, 5(6), 1.

14. Bullock, D.  (1987).  Socializing the theory of intellectual development.  In M. Chapman and R. Dixon (Eds.), Meaning and the Growth of Understanding: Wittgenstein's Significance for Developmental Psychology.  New York: Springer-Verlag, pp.187–218.

15. Bullock, D., Liederman, J., and Todorovic, D. (1987).  Reconciling stable asymmetry with recovery of function: An adaptive systems perspective on functional plasticity.  Child Develop- ment, 58: 689–697.

16. Bullock, D. and Grossberg, S. (1987).  A neural network architecture for automatic trajectory formation and coordination of multiple effectors during variable-speed arm movements.  In M. Caudill and C. Butler (Eds.), Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Neural Networks, IV: 559–566.

17. Bullock, D. and Grossberg, S. (1988).  Neural dynamics of planned arm movements:  Emergent invariants and speed-accuracy properties during trajectory formation. Psychological Review, 95: 49–90.
Reprinted in S. Grossberg and M. Kuperstein, Neural Dynamics of Adaptive Sensory Motor Control: Expanded Edition. New York: Pergamon Press, 1989. Also reprinted in S. Grossberg (Ed.), Neural Networks and Natural Intelligence, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1988.

18. Bullock, D. and Grossberg, S. (1988).  The VITE model: A neural command circuit for generating arm and articulator trajectories.  In J.A.S. Kelso, A.J. Mandell, and M.F. Shlesinger(Eds.), Dynamic Patterns in Complex Systems. Singapore: World Scientific Publishers, pp.305–326.

19. Bullock, D. (1988).  How neural networks factor problems of sensory-motor control. Proceedings of the American Control Conference, 3: 2271–2275.

20. Bullock, D. and Grossberg, S. (1988).  Self-organizing neural architectures for eye movements, arm movements, and eye-arm coordination. In H. Haken (Ed.), Neural and Synergetic Computers.  Berlin: Springer-Verlag, pp.197–228.

21. Bullock, D. (1989). Saturation is not an evolutionarily stable strategy.  Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 12: 212–214.

22. Bullock, D. and Grossberg, S.  (1989).  VITE and FLETE: Neural modules for trajectory formation and postural control.  In W.A. Hershberger (Ed.), Volitional Action. Amsterdam: North-Holland/Elsevier, pp.253–298.

23. Mingolla, E. and Bullock, D. (1989). A review of J.A. Anderson and E. Rosenfeld (Eds.), Neurocomputing: Foundations of Research.  Neural Networks, 2: 405–409.

24. Bullock, D. (1990).  Methodological heterogeneity and the anachronistic status of ANOVA in psychology.  Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 13: 122–123.

25. Bullock, D. and Grossberg, S. (1990).  FLETE: An opponent neuromuscular design for factorization of length and tension.  Proceedings of the International Joint Conference on Neural Networks, Vol. 2, pp.209–212, Washington, DC, 15–19 January.

26. Bullock, D. and Grossberg, S. (1990).  Motor skill development and neural networks for position code invariance under speed and compliance rescaling.  In H. Block and B. Bertenthal (Eds.), Sensory-motor Organizations and Development in Infancy and Early Childhood.  Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic, pp. 1–22.

27. Bullock, D. and Grossberg, S. (1990).  Spinal network computations enable independent control of muscle length and joint compliance.  In R. Eckmiller (Ed.), Advanced Neural Computers.  Amsterdam: Elsevier, pp.349–356.

28. Bullock, D., Carpenter, G., and Grossberg, S. (1991). Self-organizing neural network architectures for adaptive pattern recognition and robotics.  In V. Milutinovic and P. Antognetti (Eds.), Neural Networks: Concepts, Applications, and Implementa-tions: Volume I.  Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, pp.33–53.

29. Bullock, D. and Grossberg, S. (1991).  Adaptive neural networks for control of movement trajectories invariant under speed and force rescaling.   Human Movement Science, 10: 3–53.

30. Bullock, D. and Grossberg, S. (1991).  Reply to comments on `Adaptive neural networks for control of movement trajectories invariant under speed and force rescaling’.  Human Movement Science, 10: 133–157.

31. Boardman, I. and Bullock, D. (1991).  A neural network model of serial order recall from short-term memory.  IJCNN Proceedings, II: 879–884, Seattle, Washington.

32. Guenther, F. and Bullock, D. (1992).  A review of `Neural networks for control’.  Neural Networks, 5: 531–535.

33. Bullock, D. and Grossberg, S. (1992).  Emergence of tri-phasic muscle activation from the nonlinear interactions of central and spinal neural network circuits.  Human Movement Science, 11: 157–168.
Reprinted in Thomassen, A.J.W.M., Rosenbaum, D.A., and Van Wieringen, P.C.W. (Eds.), (1992).  Sequencing and Timing of Human Movement.  Amsterdam: North-Holland, 157–168.

34. Bullock, D., Greve, D. and Guenther, F. (1992).  Do reaches in the dark shed sufficient light on internal representations?  Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 15: 330–332.

35. Bullock, D., Contreras-Vidal, J.L., and Grossberg, S. (1992).  Equilibria and dynamics of a neural network model for opponent muscle control.  In G. Bekey and K. Goldberg (Eds.), Neural Networks in Robotics. Boston: Kluwer Academic, pp. 439–457.

36. Bullock, D., Contreras-Vidal, J.L., and Grossberg, S. (1992).  A neural network for spino-muscular generation of launching and braking forces by opponent muscles.  IJCNN Proceedings, III: 450–455.

37. Bullock, D., Greve, D., Grossberg, S., and Guenther, F.H. (1992).  A head-centered representation of 3-D target location derived from opponent eye position commands.  IJCNN Proceedings, I: 79–85.

38. Bullock, D., Grossberg, S. and Guenther, F.H. (1992).  A self-organizing neural network model for redundant sensory-motor control, motor equivalence and tool use.  IJCNN Proceedings, IV: 91–96.

39. Bullock, D. and Contreras-Vidal, J.L. (1992).  Adaptive behavioral phenotypes enabled by spinal interneuron circuits: Making sense the Darwinian way.  Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 15: 717–720.

#40. Bullock, D. and Contreras-Vidal, J.L. (1993).  How spinal neural networks reduce discrepancies between motor intention and motor realization.  In K.M. Newell and D.M. Corcos (Eds.), Variability and Motor Control. Champaign, Illinois: Human Kinetics Press, 183–221.

41. Greve, D., Grossberg, S., Guenther, F., and Bullock, D. (1993).  Neural representations for sensory-motor control, I: Head-centered 3-D target positions from opponent eye commands.  Acta Psychologica, 82: 115–138.

42. Grossberg, S., Guenther, F., Bullock, D., and Greve, D. (1993).  Neural representations for sensory-motor control, II: Learning a head-centered visuomotor representation of 3-D target position.  Neural Networks, 6: 43–67.

#43. Bullock, D., Grossberg, S., and Guenther, F.H. (1993).  A self-organizing neural model of motor equivalent reaching and tool use by a multijoint arm.  Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 5: 408–435.

#44. Bullock, D., Grossberg, S., and Mannes, C. (1993).  A neural network model for cursive script production.  Biological Cybernetics, 70: 15–28.

45. Fischer, K.W., Bullock, D., Rotenberg, E.J., and Raya, P. (1993).  The dynamics of competence: How context contributes directly to skill.  In R. Wozniak and K.W. Fischer (Eds.), Development in Context. Hillsdale,  NJ: Erlbaum, pp. 93–110.

46. Bullock, D., Contreras-Vidal, J.L., and Grossberg, S. (1993).  Cerebellar learning in an opponent motor controller for adaptive load compensation and synergy formation.  Proceedings of the World Congress on Neural Networks, Portland, IV: 481–486.  Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum Associates.

47. Bullock, D., Greve, D., Grossberg, S., and Guenther, F.H. (1993).  A self-organizing neural network for learning a body-centered invariant representation of 3-D target position.  Proceedings of the World Congress on Neural Networks, Portland, II: 405–408. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum Associates.

48. Bullock, D., Grossberg, S., and Mannes, C. (1993).  The VITEWRITE model of handwriting production.  Proceedings of the World Congress on Neural Networks, Portland, I: 507–511.  Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum Associates.

49. Bullock, D., Contreras-Vidal, J.L., and Grossberg, S. (1993).  Speed scaling and adaptive cerebellar control of Renshaw cell and motoneuron gain.  Abstracts of the Society for Neuroscience, 19: 1594.

50. Guenther, F.H., Bullock, D., Greve, D., and Grossberg, S. (1994).  Neural representations for sensory-motor control, III: Learning a body-centered representation of 3-D target position.  Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 6: 341–358.

#51. Bullock, D., Fiala, J., and Grossberg, S. (1994).   A neural model of timed response learning in the cerebellum.  Neural Networks, 7: 1101–1114.

52. Bullock, D. (1994).  Flexible motor control by forebrain, cerebellar, and spinal circuits.  Proceedings of the World Congress on Neural Networks, San Diego, CA, II: 703–708.  Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum Associates.

53. Bullock, D., Cisek, P.E., and Grossberg, S. (1994).  A neural model of voluntary movement and proprioception.  Abstracts of the Society for Neuroscience, 20: 1405.

54. Bullock, D. (1995).  Motoneuron recruitment.  In M.A. Arbib (Ed.) The Handbook of Brain Theory and Neural Networks.  Cambridge, MA: Bradford Books/MIT Press, pp. 594–597.

55. Bullock, D., Grossberg, S., and Guenther, F.H. (1996).  Neural network modeling of sensory-motor control in animals.  In H. Zelaznik (Ed.), Advances in Motor Learning and Control. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics Publishers, pp. 261-292.

#56. Fiala, J.C., Grossberg, S., and Bullock, D. (1996).  Metabotropic glutamate receptor activation in cerebellar Purkinje cells as substrate for adaptive timing of the classically conditioned eye blink response.  Journal of Neuroscience, 16: 3760–3774.

57. Fiala, J.C. and Bullock, D. (1996).  Timing implications of metabotropic mechanisms for cerebellar learning.  Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 19: 445–447.

58. Bullock, D. (1996).  Toward a reconstructive understanding of behavior: A response to Reece's “How is physiology relevant to behavior analysis?”  The Behavior Analyst, 19: 75–78.

#59. Izquierdo, L.F., Bullock, D., and Coronado, J.L. (1996).  Alternative spatial coordinate frames and DIRECT control of redundant manipulators.  Proceedings of the IARP International Workshop on Medical Robots, Vienna, Austria, 1–2 October 1996, pp. 55–62.

60. Bullock, D., Fiala, J.C., and Grossberg, S. (1996).  Metabotropic glutamate receptor activation in cerebellar Purkinje cells as substrate for adaptive timing in eye-blink conditioning.  Society for Neuroscience Abstracts, 22: 1200.

#61. Grossberg, S., Roberts, K., Aguilar, M., and Bullock, D. (1997).  A neural network model of adaptive saccadic eye movement control by superior colliculus.  Journal of Neuroscience, 17: 9706-9725.

62. Cisek, P., Bullock, D., and Grossberg, S. (1997).  Cortical circuits for control of voluntary arm movements.  In J.M. Bower (Ed.), Computational Neuroscience `96.  New York: Plenum Press, 287-292. 

#63. Contreras-Vidal, J.L., Grossberg, S., and Bullock, D. (1997). A neural model of cerebellar learning for arm movement control: Cortico-spino-cerebellar dynamics.  Learning and Memory, 3: 475-502.

#64. Bullock, D. (1998). Neural networks research as a specialization of dynamical systems theory:  Learned coupling coefficients for adaptive mode switching.  In A. Post, J.R. Pijpers, P. Bosch, & M.S.J. Boschker (Ed.), Models in Human Movement Sciences.  Enschede: PrintPartners Ipskamp, pp. 69-88.

#65. Bullock, D., Cisek, P.E., and Grossberg, S. (1998).  Cortical networks for control of voluntary arm movements under variable force conditions.  Cerebral Cortex, 8: 48-62.

#66. Cisek, P., Grossberg, S., and Bullock, D. (1998).  A cortico-spinal model of reaching and proprioception under multiple task constraints. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 10: 425-444.

#67.  Bullock, D. (1998). Social interaction, language games, and cognitive convergence rate.   Intellectica, 26/27: 149-180.

68.  Bullock, D., Contreras-Vidal, J.L., and Grossberg, S. (1995).  Inertial load compensation by a model spinal circuit during single joint movement.  Boston University Technical Report CAS/CNS-TR-95-007.  

69.  Pribe, C.A. and Bullock, D. (1995).  How Listing's Law may emerge from neural control of reactive saccades.  Boston University Technical Report CAS/CNS-TR-95-027.

#70. Jacobs, J. P. and Bullock, D. (1998).  A two-process model for control of legato articulation across a wide range of tempos during piano performance.  Music Perception, 16: 169-199.

#71. van Heijst, J.J., Vos, J.E., and Bullock, D. (1998).  Development in a biologically inspired spinal neural network for movement control.  Neural Networks, 11: 1305-1316.

#72. Bullock, D. (1998).  Sensory-motor learning, planning, and timing.  In G.A. Ritschard, A. Berchtold, F. Duc, and D.A. Zighed (Eds)., Apprentissage, des principes naturels aux modeles artificiels.  Paris:  Hermes, pp. 43-66.

73. Bullock, D. (1998). A review of “Multiple model approaches to modelling and control”  International Journal of Neural Systems.

74. Jacobs, J. P. & Bullock, D. (1998).  Philosophical and cognitive neuroscience considerations for studying affect in music.  Proceedings of the Fifth International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition, Seoul, Korea, 26-30 August, 1998.

75. Ajemian, R., Bullock, D., and Grossberg, S. (1998).  Computing single-cell activity in motor cortex as a function of movement direction, hand-speed, and intrinsic cellular coordinates.  Society for Neuroscience Abstracts, 24: 1415.

#76. Bullock, D., Bongers, R., Lankhorst, M., and Beek, P.J. (1999).  A vector-integration-to-endpoint model for performance of viapoint movements.  Neural Networks, 12: 1-29.

#77. Brown, J., Bullock, D., and Grossberg, S. (1999).  How the basal ganglia use parallel excitatory and inhibitory learning pathways to selectively respond to unexpected rewarding cues.   Journal of Neuroscience, 19: 10502-10511.

78.  Negishi, M., Bullock, D., and Cohen, M. (1999).  A self-organizing two-stream model of language comprehension.  Proceedings of the International Joint Conference on Neural Networks, Washington, D.C., 10-16 July 1999, p. 276.

79. Contreras-Vidal, J.L. and Bullock, D. (1999).  A theory of basal ganglia control of normal and Parkinsonian handwriting. Society for Neuroscience Abstracts, 25: 1926.

80. Brown, J., Bullock, D., and Grossberg, S. (1999).  How the basal ganglia use parallel excitatory and inhibitory learning pathways to selectively respond to unexpected rewarding cues.  Society for Neuroscience Abstracts, 25: 376.

81. Brown, J., Bullock, D., and Grossberg, S. (2000). Biomimetic circuits for autonomously learning to selectively respond to unexpected reward related events.  Proceedings of the Humanoids 2000 Conference, Cambridge, MA, 7-8 September 2000.

#82. Ajemian, R., Bullock, D., and Grossberg, S. (2000).  Kinematic coordinates in which motor cortical cells encode movement direction.   Journal of Neurophysiology, 80: 2191-2203.

83. Rhodes, B. and Bullock, D. (2000). An adaptive network model of cortico-cerebellar contributions to practice effects in serial movement timing. Bulletin of the International Graphonomics Society, November.

#84. Ajemian, R., Bullock, D. and Grossberg, S. (2001).  A model of movement coordinates in motor cortex: Posture-dependent changes in the gain and direction of single cell tuning curves. Cerebral Cortex, 11: 1124-1135.

#85. Bullock, D. (2001).  Cortical models for movement control.  Chapter 7 in H.A.K. Mastebroek and J.E. Vos (Eds.), Plausible neural networks for biological modelling.  Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers, pp. 135-162.

#86. Rhodes, B. and Bullock, D. (2002). A scalable model of cerebellar adaptive timing and sequencing: The recurrent slide and latch (RSL) model.  Applied Intelligence, 17: 35-48.

87. Ulloa, A. and Bullock, D.  (2001). A neural circuit for coordinating reaching with grasping: Autocompensating variable initial apertures, perturbations to target size, and perturbations to target orientation.  Proceedings of the International Joint Conference on Neural Networks, Washington, D.C., 14-19 July 2001.

88. Ajemian, R., Sergio, L., Bullock, D., Grossberg, S., and Kalaska, J.F. (2001). Posture-dependent changes in MI cell tuning in an isometric task: comparison of model predictions with neural data. Abstracts of the Society for Neuroscience.

#89. Dessing, J., Bullock, D., Peper, C.E. and Beek, P.J. (2002). Prospective control of manual interceptive actions: Comparative simulations of extant and new model constructs. Neural Networks, 15: 163-179.

#90. Bullock, D. (2003).  Motoneuron recruitment.  In M. Arbib (Ed.) Handbook of brain theory and neural networks, 2ed.  Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, pp. 683-686.

#91. Bullock, D. and Rhodes, B. (2003).  Competitive queuing for serial planning and performance.  In M. Arbib (Ed.) Handbook of brain theory and neural networks, 2ed.  Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, pp. 241-244. 

#92. van der Smagt, P. and Bullock, D. (2002). Introduction to the special issue: Scalable applications of neural networks to robotics.  Applied Intelligence, 17: 7-10.

#93. Rhodes, B. and Bullock, D. (2002).  Neural dynamics of learning and performance of fixed sequences: Latency pattern reorganizations and the N-STREAMS model.  Boston University Technical Report CAS/CNS-02-007. Submitted for publication.

#94. Beek, P.J., Dessing, J.C., Peper, C.E., and Bullock, D. (2003). Modelling the control of interceptive actions.  Philosophical Transactions: Biological Sciences. Proceedings of the Royal Society, 358, 1511-1523.

#95. Ulloa, A. and Bullock, D. (2003).  A neural network simulating human reach-grasp coordination by continuous updating of vector positioning commands.  Neural Networks, 16: 1141-1160.

#96. Ulloa, A., Bullock, D., and Rhodes, B. (2003). A model of cerebellar adaptation of grip forces during lifting. Proceedings of the IJCNN, 4: 3167-3172..

#97. Ulloa, A., Bullock, D., and Rhodes, B. (2003).  Adaptive force generation for precision-grip lifting by a spectral timing model of the cerebellum.  Neural Networks, 16: 521-528.

#98. Bullock, D. (2003). From parallel sequence representations to calligraphic control. In H.-L. Teulings & A.W.A. Van Gemmert (Eds.), Proceedings of the 11th Conference of the International Graphonomics Society, pp. 63-66.

99. Prince, C.G, Berthouze, L., Kozima, H., Bullock, D., Stojanov, G., and Balkenius, C. (2003). Proceedings of the Third International Workshop on Epigenetic Robotics. Lund University Cognitive Studies, vol. 101.

#100. Brown, J., Bullock, D., and Grossberg, S. (2004). How laminar frontal cortex and basal ganglia circuits interact to control planned and reactive saccades. Neural Networks, 17: 471-510.

#101. Bullock, D. (2004). Adaptive neural models of queuing and timing in fluent action. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 8: 427-435.

#102. Rhodes, B.J., Bullock, D., Verwey, W.B., Averbeck, B.B., and Page, M.P.A. (2004). Learning and production of movement sequences: Behavioral, neurophysiological, and modeling perspectives. Human Movement Science, 23: 683-730.

#103. Bullock, D. (2004). From parallel sequence representations to calligraphic control: A conspiracy of neural circuits. Motor Control, 8: 371-391.

#104. Dessing, J.C., Peper, C.E., Bullock, D., and Beek, P.J. (2005). How position, velocity and temporal information combine in prospective control of catching: Data and model. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 17: 668-686.

#105. Agam, Y., Bullock, D., and Sekuler, R. (2005). Imitating unfamiliar sequences of connected linear motions. Journal of Neurophysiology, 94: 2832 - 2843.

106. Agam, Y., Bullock, D., and Sekuler, R. (2005). Error profiles and working memory representations of sequences during imitation. Abstracts of the Society for Neuroscience.

107. Srihasam, K., Bullock, D., and Grossberg, S. (2005). Brain mechanisms for effective coordination of saccades and smooth pursuit eye movements during visual tracking and perception. Abstracts of the Society for Neuroscience.

#108. Bullock, D. (2005). Modeling cortico-subcortical interactions during planning, learning, and voluntary control of actions. Proceedings of the IJCNN.

#109. Rucci, M., Bullock, D., Santini, F. (2007).  Integrating robotics and neuroscience: brains for robots, bodies for brains.  Advanced Robotics, 21: 1115-1129.

#110. Tan, C.O. and Bullock, D. (2008). Neuropeptide co-release with GABA may explain functional non-monotonic uncertainty responses in dopamine neurons.  Neuroscience Letters, 430: 218-223.

#111. Tan, C.O., Anderson, E., Dranias, M., and Bullock, D. (2008). Can the apparent adaptation of dopamine neurons' mismatch sensitivities be reconciled with their computation of reward prediction errors?  Neuroscience Letters, 438: 14-16.

#112.  Ajemian, R., Green, A., Bullock, D., Sergio, L., Kalaska, J., Grossberg, S. (2008). Assessing the function of motor cortex: Single-neuron models of how neural response is modulated by limb biomechanics. Neuron, 58: 414-428.

#113.  Grossberg, S., Bullock, D., and Dranias, M.R. (2008). Neural dynamics underlying impaired autonomic and conditioned responses following amygdala and orbitofrontal lesions.  Behavioral Neuroscience, 122: 1100-1125.

#114. Dranias, M.R., Grossberg, S. & Bullock, D. (2008). Dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic value systems in conditioning and outcome-specific revaluation. Brain Research, 1238: 239-287.

#115. Tan, C.O. and Bullock, D. (2008). A dopamine-acetylcholine cascade: Simulating learned and lesion-induced behavior of striatal cholinergic interneurons. Journal of Neurophysiology, 100: 2409-2421.

#116. Tan, C.O. and Bullock, D. (2008). A local circuit model of learned striatal and dopamine cell responses under probabilistic schedules of reward.  Journal of Neuroscience, 28: 10062-10074.

#117.   Srihasam, K., Bullock, D. & Grossberg, S. (2009). Target selection by frontal cortex during coordinated saccadic and smooth pursuit eye movements.  Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 21: 1611-27.

#118.   Bullock, D., Tan, C.O., and John, Y.J.  (2009). Computational perspectives on forebrain microcircuits implicated in reinforcement learning, action selection, and cognitive control.  Neural Networks, 22: 757-765.

#119.   Bohland, J.W., Bullock, D., and Guenther, F.H. (2009). Neural representations and mechanisms for the performance of simple speech sequences.  In press, Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience.

 

# indicates that the paper is available as a pdf via an email request to danb@cns.bu.edu.


 

DISSERTATIONS SUPERVISED AS PRIMARY or Co-ADVISOR:

 

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